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There are several different ranks, or stations, in the kingdoms of Karyle. Generally, they are classified according to specific differences between the various ranks in society. Royalty, in all respects, comes before nobility. The nobility are technically part of the gentry, but then they are not. Below the nobility are the true gentry, and below the gentry are peasants and working class. This will explain everything, including how some titles relate to one another and how you would refer to people possessing certain titles.

This page is very long, but it possesses a wealth of valuable information!

The RoyaltyEdit

The titles of royalty are ranked in order of importance, or denote a specific title. The royals are more powerful than all the peers, though the closest peer to the royal title is a Duke. The titles are as follows:

  • King/Queen
  • Prince/Princess
  • Parliament
  • Privy Council

As far as Parliament and the Privy Council are concerned, they are related to each other. Privy Council members are specifically assigned to each sovereign, acting as close advisors on all matters. Parliament is the legislature of Karyle's kingdoms, and its members are elected by citizens of the country.

There are ten members of Parliament for each country, not including the Great Officers of State and the Privy Council. There are three members of the Privy Council for each sovereign, not including the Great Officers of State; consorts do not possess their own Privy Council, unless they are acting as regent in the even of the Sovereign's death or inability to rule.

The Privy Council is a part of Parliament, though the two are often considered two separate entities, and the Great Officers of State are part of both. In total, there are twenty-two members of Parliament for each country.

The King and QueenEdit

The KingEdit

  • In speech: Your Majesty--firstly; Sire--afterwards
  • In reference: His Majesty or The King
  • Heading for Letters: Your Majesty

The QueenEdit

  • In speech: Your Majesty or Your Royal Highness or Your Grace--firstly; Ma'am or Madam--afterwards
  • In reference: Her Majesty or Her Royal Highness or Her Grace or The Queen
  • Heading for Letters: Your Majesty or Your Highness or Your Grace

The Prince and PrincessEdit

The Eldest PrinceEdit

  • In speech: Your Royal Highness or Your Highness--firstly; Sir--afterwards
  • In reference: His Royal Highness or His Highness or Prince (first name)
  • Heading for Letters: Your Royal Highness

The PrinceEdit

  • In speech: Your Highness--firstly; Sir--afterwards
  • In reference: His Highness or Prince (first name)
  • Heading for Letters: Your Highness

The Eldest PrincessEdit

  • In speech: Your Royal Highness or Your Highness--firstly; Ma'am--afterwards
  • In reference: Her Royal Highness or Her Highness or Princess (first name)
  • Heading for Letters: Your Royal Highness

The PrincessEdit

  • In speech: Your Highness--firstly; Ma'am--afterwards
  • In reference: Her Highness or Princess (first name)
  • Heading for Letters: Your Highness

A Note on Prince/Princess TitlesEdit

It should be noted that many royal children also possess a customary succession title, which indicates where they are in the line of succession. These titles will be covered on the individual pages for each country. Please remember that you character is expected to refer to them by using the above froms, however. Failure to do so might mean making it to the Royal Family's bad side.

Additionally, the use of Your Royal Highness is only applied to the eldest legitimate child of the sovereign; essentially, only the heir to the throne is allowed to use Your Royal Highness.

Parliament and the Privy CouncilEdit

ParliamentEdit

  • In speech: Master (last name)--firstly; My Lord--afterwards
  • In reference: Master (last name) or My Lord of the King's/Queen's Parliament
  • Heading for Letters: Master (first and last name) of the King's/Queen's Parliament

The Privy CouncilEdit

  • In speech: Master (last name)--firstly; My Lord--afterwards
  • In reference: Master (last name) or My Lord of the King's/Queen's Privy Council
  • Heading for Letters: Master (first and last name) of the King's/Queen's Privy Council

A Note on Parliament/Privy Council TitlesEdit

When heading letters addressed to Parliament or the Privy Council, you must select whether it is the King's or the Queen's Parliament or Privy Council. Remember that queens only have a Privy Council or control of Parliament in the event of regency.

When heading letters addressed to members of Parliament or the Privy Council who have a noble title, you format the heading as thus: Lord (first and last name) of the King's/Queen's Parliament/Privy Council, (Title of Nobility)

For example: Lord Edward Hale of the King's Parliament, the Earl of Morhall or Lord Edward Hale of the Queen's Privy Council, the Earl of Morhall.

Great Officers of StateEdit

Included in Parliament are the Great Officers of State, who are appointed by the Sovereign of the country rather than elected by the citizens. The Great Officers of State are the Lord High Steward, Lord Chancellor, Lord High Treasurer, Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal, Lord Great Chamberlain, Lord High Constable, Earl Marshal, and the Lord High Admiral. Below you will find a list of what each office does.

  • The Lord High Steward sees to the upkeep of all royal palaces, presents patents of noble titles to their recipients during a ceremony organized by the Lord Chamberlain, and makes sure that all those in royal employ are appropriately paid--including the nobles.
  • The Lord Chancellor is the chief diplomat of the country and, with the permission of the Sovereign, appoints members of the nobility or other stations to live in the other countries as Ambassadors for the Crown.
  • The Lord High Treasurer manages both the Sovereign's personal treasury and the country's treasury and all things related to them, such as taxes.
  • The Lord Privy Seal is charged with the stamping of all official business of the Crown; they, and they alone, are the ones who possess the official badge-stamp of the royal family's badge. The Lord Privy Seal if often the one who writes official documents and the Sovereign's speeches and other things of the sort.
  • The Lord Chamberlain organizes meetings between Parliament and the Privy Council and also organizes ceremonial events, such as state dinners or royal weddings.
  • The Lord High Constable makes all arrests for crimes against the Crown and is the Master of the nation's prison. He is also at the head of all judicial trials that may be held.
  • The Earl Marshal is at the head of the nation's military and all its troops, and also has the ability to make referrences of Knighthoods to the Sovereign.
  • The Lord High Admiral is at the head of the nation's naval forces and the Crown's entire fleet, and also has the ability to make referrences of Knighthoods to the Sovereign.

A Note on Great Officers of State TitlesEdit

When heading letters addressed to a member of Parliament or the Privy Council who is also a Great Officer of State, you would format it thus: Master (first and last name) of the King's/Queen's Parliament/Privy Council, (Great Officer Title).

For example: Master Edward Hale of the King's Parliament, Lord High Treasurer

If the member of Parliament or the Privy Council is a noble and a Great Officer of State, you would format it as thus: Lord (first and last name) of the King's/Queen's Parliament/Privy Council, (Title of Nobility), (Great Officer Title).

For example: Lord Edward Hale of the King's Privy Council, the Earl of Morhall, Lord High Treasurer

Household TitlesEdit

While the household titles--Lord Steward and (Master) Secretary--are not part of Parliament or the Privy Council, they are certainly worthy of mention. Both the King and Queen each have a Lord Steward. These positions, the Lord Steward and (Master) Secretary, are often sought out due to their close proximity to the Sovereign and Consort and sometimes can even lead to a position as a Great Officer of State.

  • The Lord Steward sees to it that all Members of the Household, both for the King and the Queen, are appropriately paid. The Lord Steward of the King's Household also oversees the payment of members of the Princes' Household(s). Likewise, the Lord Steward of the Queen's Household oversees the payment of members of the Princess's Household(s).
  • The (Master) Secretary is in charge with drafting all documents and the letters the King or Queen issues, should they desire the assistance. The (Master) Secretary all reads all documents addressed to the King or Queen before the letters are presented to their respective owners--unless the letters are sneaked in, of course.

Master Secretary vs. SecretaryEdit

The difference between Master Secretary and Secretary is that the Master Secretary serves the ruling sovereign and the Secretary serves the consort. The sovereign's secretary is referred to as Master Secretary (last name) and the consort's secretary is referred to as Secretary (last name).

A Note on Household TitlesEdit

When heading letters addressed for Members of the Household, you would format it as thus: Master (first and last name), Household title of the King's/Queen's Household.

For example: Master George London, Lord Steward of the King's Household

When heading letters addressed for Members of the Household who hold noble titles, you would format it as thus: Lord (first and last name) Title of Nobility, Household title.

For example: Lord George London the Baron Southwall, Lord Steward of the Queen's Household

The NobilityEdit

The nobility is above the aristocracy, and even further above the gentry. Along with being referred to as nobles, they are also referred to as peers among themselves. A Duke is generally the most powerful peer, and a Baron is the least powerful peer. The titles are as follows:

  • Duke/Duchess
  • Marquess/Marchioness
  • Earl/Countess
  • Viscount/Viscountess
  • Baron/Baroness

The Duke and DuchessEdit

The DukeEdit

  • In speech: Your Grace
  • In reference: His Grace or Lord ----- or My Lord Duke of -----
  • Heading for Letters: My Lord Duke of ----- or Dear Duke of -----

The DuchessEdit

  • In speech: Your Grace
  • in reference: Her Grace or Lady ----- or My Lady Duchess of -----
  • Heading for Letters: Duchess of ----- or Dear Duchess of -----

The Marquess and MarchionessEdit

The MarquessEdit

  • In speech: My Lord or Your Grace or Lord -----
  • In reference: His Grace or Lord ----- or My Lord Marquess of -----
  • Heading for Letters: My Lord Marquess or Dear Marquess of -----

The MarchionessEdit

  • In speech: My Lady or Your Grace or Lady -----
  • In reference: Her Grace or Lady ------ or My Lady Marchioness of -----
  • Heading for Letters: Madam or Dear Marchioness of -----

The Marquess as a Succession TitleEdit

It is important to mention that when a female possesses the title of Marquess as a succesion title--by her birthright, not by marriage--she does not use the title Marchioness. She would instead use the title of Marquess. You would not refer to her as such, but we've provided the appropriate references anyhow.

The Marquess (female succession holder)Edit

  • In speech: My Lady or Your Grace or Lady -----
  • In reference: Her Grace or Lady ----- or My Lady
  • Heading for Letters: My Lady Marquess or Dear Marquess of -----

The MarqEdit

When the female holder of a succession Marquess title marries, her husband is allowed the title of Marq to indicate that he has married a member of the Royal Family. If he possesses no other titles, you would refer to him by the honourifics found below.

  • In speech: Your Highness or Your Grace--firstly, Lord ------ or My Lord--afterwards
  • In reference: His Highness or His Grace or Lord ----- or My Lord Marq of -----
  • Heading for Letters: Your Highness or Your Grace or My Lord Marq or Dear Marq of -----

The Lady MarquessEdit

When the male holder of the succession Marquess title marries, his wife is allowed the title of Lady Marquess to inidicate that she has married a member of the Royal Family. If she possesses no other titles, you would refer to her by honourfics found below.

  • In speech: Your Highness or Your Grace--firstly, Lady ----- or My Lady--afterwards
  • In reference: Her Highness or Her Grace or Lady ----- or My Lady Marquess of -----
  • Heading for Letters: Your Highness or Your Grace or My Lady Marquess or Dear Lady Marquess of -----

The Earl and CountessEdit

The EarlEdit

  • In speech: My Lord or Your Grace or Lord -----
  • In reference: His Grace or Lord ----- or My Lord Earl of -----
  • Heading for Letters: My Lord or Dear Earl of -----

The CountessEdit

  • In speech: My Lady or Your Grace or Lady -----
  • In reference: Her Grace or Lady ----- or My Lady Countess of -----
  • Heading for Letters: Madam or Dear Countess of -----

The Viscount and ViscountessEdit

Notice the the Viscounts are referred to as Viscount -----, rather than Viscount of ----- like the previous noble titles.

The ViscountEdit

  • In speech: My Lord or Your Lordship or Lord -----
  • In reference: His Lordship or Lord ----- or My Lord Viscount -----
  • Heading for Letters: My Lord or Dear Viscount -----

The ViscountessEdit

  • In speech: My Lady or Your Ladyship or Lady -----
  • In reference: Her Ladyship or Lady ----- or My Lady Viscountess -----
  • Heading for Letters: My Lady or Dear Viscountess -----

The Baron and BaronessEdit

Notice that the Barons are referred to as Baron -----, rather than Baron of ----- like the previous noble titles. When the title Baroness is used as a succession title for a princess, it is considered to be a Baroness in Her Own Right.

A Baroness in Her Own Right is only made so when it is used as a succession title, when the reigning monarch makes a woman a Baroness, or when the Baron dies and there is no living male to succeed him.

The BaronEdit

  • In speech: My Lord or Your Lordship or Lord -----
  • In reference: His Lordship or Lord ----- or My Lord Baron -----
  • Heading for Letters: My Lord or Dear Lord -----

The Baroness--by her husbandEdit

  • In speech: My Lady or Your Ladyship or Lady -----
  • In reference: Her Ladyship or Lady ----- or My Lady -----
  • Heading for Letters: Madam or Lady -----

The Baroness in Her Own RightEdit

  • In speech: My Lady or Your Ladyship or Lady ----- or Baroness -----
  • In reference: Her Ladyship or Lady ----- or My Lady Baroness -----
  • Heading for Letters: Madam or Dear Lady ----- or Baroness -----

Titles of NobilityEdit

You will note that titles of the nobility, such as Dukes or Marquesses, is referred to by the title they have. For example, even if the Duke of Loren is named Thomas Sommerly, he would not be referred to as Lord Sommerly. He is referred to as My Lord Duke of Loren.

Anywhere you see "-----" you use the title they have, not their name. It is noted where you would use their name.

Widows of Noble Title HoldersEdit

In the event a nobleman's wife--the Queen is included in this category--survives her husband, the title that she assumes depends on who succeeds to his title. As an example, if the person who succeeds to a duchy is unmarried, the Duchess merely drops the "the" from her formal name. If and when he is married, the Duchess adds the word "Dowager" to her title.

For example: Lady Margaret Broughton is the widow of the late Duke of Lorwick, who was succeeded by his younger brother. Because the new Duke of Lorwick is not yet married, Margaret is now called Margaret, Duchess of Lorwick as opposed to being called Margaret the Duchess of Lorwick like she was when her husband was living.
When the current Duke of Lorwick marries, however, Margaret's title will change again. She will become The Dowager Duchess of Lorwick. In reference, she would be Margaret the Dowager Duchess of Lorwick. Though, the scenario would be completely different if there already was a Dowager Duchess of Lorwick. In that case, Margaret would be called Margaret, Duchess of Lorwick.

Courtesy Title HoldersEdit

Those who possess noble titles by courtesy of their parents and not in their own right are referred to as Courtesy Title Holders. The title they assume depends on the titles their parents possess. Titles by courtesy do not use a definite article, such as the.

If the father possesses two noble titles, the eldest son assumes the lesser title by courtesy.

For example: Lord James Philipson is the Duke of Swynhall and the Marquess of Eralon. His eldest son's--Thomas--formal title, by courtesy, would be His Grace Lord Thomas Philipson, Marquess of Eralon. Any other child that James might have would be simply known as Lord/Lady and then their name.

If the father possesses three noble the titles, the eldest two sons assume the lesser titles by courtesy.

For example: Lord James Philipson is the Duke of Swynhall, the Marquess of Eralon, and the Earl of Newacre. Thomas, the eldest son, would assume the formal title of His Grace Lord Thomas Philipson, Marquess of Eralon.  Edward, the second eldest son, would the assume the formal title of His Grace Lord Edward Philipson, Earl of Newacre.

The Use of HonorableEdit

The prefix Honorable is only used by grandchildren of a noble whose parent's did not assume a courtesy title.

For example: Samuel Chetwoode was the eldest son of the Marquess of Esmour, who only possessed a marquesate title. Therefore, Samuel did not assume a courtesy title and was simply known as Lord Samuel Chetwoode. When Samuel married and his wife gave birth to their daughter Adelle, the baby was known as The Honorable Adelle Chetwoode. Adelle did not become Lady Adelle until her grandfather died and her father inherited the Marquesate of Esmour.

The GentryEdit

These people are, more or less, the backbone of Karyle's society. These are smiths, knights, and others who have to work for a living. It is not a bad thing to be counted in the gentry, but some can be destitute while others have a fairly good standard of living. The members of the gentry are as follows:

  • Clergy
  • Knights
  • Groom's Men/Ladies-in-Waiting or Maids of Honor

There are a number of Groom's Men and Ladies-in-Waiting assigned to a King or Queen, a number which is generally decided by whom they will serve. As they attend royalty, they are generally--but not always--younger than their superiors. The main difference between Ladies-in-Waiting and Maids of Honour is that the former are married, while the latter are generally unmarried.

The ClergyEdit

  • In speech: Your Eminence
  • In reference: His/Her Eminence
  • Heading for Letters: The Most Eminent Priest(ess) of -----

In this case, you would use the "-----" to supplement what deity the priest has dedicated themselves to.

The KnighthoodsEdit

Each country has their own set of knighthoods that the sovereign may choose to bestow for a variety of reasons; these will be covered more individually on each country's page. Knight do not really have a special form of addressment. A knighthood is more like a decoration to a name.

Knights are allowed to add "Sir" to the beginning of their name and should be referred to as such.

Groom's Men and Ladies-in-Waiting/Maids of HonourEdit

Groom's MenEdit

  • In speech: Master (last name)--firstly, Lord (first name)--afterwards
  • In reference: Master (last name) or Lord (first name)
  • Heading for Letters: Master (first and last name) of the King's/Prince's Household

Ladies-in-Waiting/Maids of HonourEdit

  • In speech: Mistress (last name or first name--see note)--firstly, Lady (first name)--afterwards
  • In speech: Mistress (last name or first name--see note) or Lady (first name)
  • Heading for Letters: Mistress (first and last name) of the Queen's/Princess's Household

The Headmaster and HeadmistressEdit

Each household, whether it's the King's, the Queen's, the Prince's, or the Princess's, is ruled and run by the appropriate royal; however, because the monarch and consort have many things they must worry about, much of the burden of running the household falls one individual--that is a Groom's Men or a Lady-in-Waiting--under royal service. They are called Headmaster and Headmistress, respectively. Only a Lady-in-Waiting may be the Headmistress of the Household. Below you will find the appropriate referrences for the heads of the households.

The HeadmasterEdit

  • In speech: Headmaster (last name)--firstly, Master (last name) or Lord (first name)--afterwards
  • In reference: Headmaster (last name) or Master (last name) or Lord (first name)
  • Heading for Letters: Headmaster (first and last name) of the Chamber

The HeadmistressEdit

  • In speech: Headmistress (last name)--firstly, Mistress (first or last name) or Lady (first name)--afterwards
  • In reference: Headmistess (last name) or Mistress (first or last name) or Lady (first name)
  • Heading for Letters: Headmistress (first and last name) of the Chamber

The Use of MistressEdit

Only the eldest daughter is allowed to use Mistress (last name). All younger daughters must use Mistress (first name). For example, if Elizabeth Stafford is the oldest sister and Eleanor is the youngest, Elizabeth is allowed to use Mistress Stafford but her sister must use Mistress Eleanor.

A woman is generally only referred to as Mistress when she is unmarried.

Maitresse en TitreEdit

The title of maitresse en titre is informally bestowed upon a woman who has become the mistress of a high-ranking man, usually a King. When a woman is a maitresse en titre, she is the only mistress that man will have and is often openly treated as such.

Because this is an informal title, there is no set way to refer to a woman who is a maitresse en titre.

PirateEdit

Pirates are sea-fairing folk that sail the world, boarding other vessels in the hopes of recovering vast fortunes. Though they are not officially considered citizens of any country, it is no secret that some pirates operate in the Sovereign's name and attack ships of opposing countries.

Pirates are not generally in good health or mannerisms and many fulfill their dream of dying at sea.

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